Focus on New Zealand

new-zealand-flag

Training programs that currently are in demand address management development topics, sales, customer service, and communication and presentation skills.

Reprinted from “Training: The Source for Professional Development” by Dr. Neil Orkin

New Zealand depends on its export prowess to help keep its economy healthy. The challenge is that its products are mainly agricultural. The New Zealand government wants to change this model to one where its citizens are able to produce and export finished products, which requires a higher skill set.

Watersports, hiking, skiing. For those who love the outdoors and nature, New Zealand is the place to be. New Zealand has a population of 4.5 million. Its citizens boast a high standard of living, and a 99-plus percent literacy rate. English is the main language.

New Zealand depends on its export prowess to help keep its economy healthy. The challenge is that its products are mainly agricultural. Tourism is also a major source of income for this country. The New Zealand government wants to change this model to one where its citizens are able to produce and export finished products, which requires a higher skill set. Producing these finished goods also would allow a much higher revenue stream. Making this transition to a more developed economy is of keen interest to policymakers in this country.

The government is moving toward developing a higher-skilled workforce. Worker training plays a key role in these plans. Companies that invest in training these highly literate employees can experience great business success. In these times of oversaturated home markets and organizational pressures to grow markets, many companies use New Zealand as a base of operations to sell their products and services in Australia, the Far East, and the Pacific Rim.

That said, the costs of training can be higher because of New Zealand’s far-off location, and the transportation costs involved in getting materials there. Training programs usually run two days and are conducted off site at hotels or university learning centers in one of the three largest cities in the country: Wellington, the capital of New Zealand; Auckland; or Christchurch. Training programs that currently are in demand address management development topics, sales, customer service, and communication and presentation skills.

TRAINING TIPS

  • New Zealanders enjoy fast-paced practical Programs. The more “hands on” the better. keep adult learning principles and practices in mind when doing course development. Your participants will respect your expertise, but won’t expect you to conduct a traditional program, with the trainer providing the class with expertise through lecture.
  • Small group activities are welcome and expected But be mindful that participants don’t want to singled out in class keep the group front and center.
  • In One sense New Zealanders are informal but many have a reserved nature. They want to get to know you, but it could take a little while before they start to ask questions. Be patient and flexible.

New Zealand is a beautiful country with a highly literate population that respects and values training. Your organization can build an effective training operation in this country quickly.

Dr. Neil Orkin is president of Global Training Systems. His organization prepares corporate professionals for global business success.